A sci-fi short about augmented reality.
“Strange Beasts” is an augmented reality game. It allows you to create and grow your own virtual pet. How far can it go?

Written, directed and produced by Magali Barbé. Co-produced by: Red Knuckles, Peanut.
imdb.com/title/tt5638002/

Rendered with renderman (Pixar). Will be added to the credits soon!

If you’re curious about the process…
magalibarbe.com/

CAST & CREW
staring: Timothy RENOUF and Poppy POLIVNICK
music and sound design: Pierre VEDOVATO
director of photography: Anthony GUIRY
first assistant: Amélie GUYOT
second assistant: Vincent AUPETIT
sound recordist: Michael CHUBB
makeup and hair: Bridget CROTTY and Rachael THOMAS
runner: Tyrone PAUL
VFX supervisor: Peregrine McCAFFERTY
creatures artist: Dean FRATER
creatures designer: Jonathan Djob NKONDO
rigger: Maickel PASTA
animators: Joffrey ZEITOUNI and Philippe MOINE
rendering and compositing: Mario UCCI and Rick THIELE at Red Knuckles
tracking: PEANUT
color artist: Lewis CROSSFIELD at Electric Theatre Collective
extra creatures: Andriy HRMALYUK and Ramtin AHMAD
special thanks: Fabrice LE NEZET, Ardith BIRCHALL, Cressida POLIVNINCK, Marc POLIVNICK, Mary HESKEL, Elvis BAPTISTE.

Cast: Magali Barbé

Tags: narrative, short film, CG, 3D, virtual reality, augmented reality, new technologies, VR, AR and scifi

Pin It
Categories: Video

Cannes in a Van Best Motion Graphics Design Runner up, Ganador del Tercer lugar del Festival de Danza Agite y Sirva, México, Best of #ArtSetFree de ArtsBrookfield, NY, PEARL winnerfilm/ Pool-festival, Berlin. Top ten in Cinema Perpetuum Mobile Film Festival. Official selection: ANIMA 2013, Argentina, Baixada Animada Brazil, Cut Out Fest, Mexico, Female in Film Industry, Mexico, Dance Camara West,USA.

A hula hoop floats amidst a stunning location of México city. As it moves, a dancer appears and plays with the hoop. Every movement creates lines, impressive shapes and lights that float in the space as if being drawn to gradually create an impressive sculpture in movement.

# Director: Daniela Villanueva, Mara Soler
# Dancers: Brecken Rivara, Tiana Zoumer
# Production: César Moheno Plá
# Camera: Pamela Albarran
# Music: Julian Placencia / Teen Flirt
# Animation: Daniela Villanueva, Mara Soler, Alejandro Caballero, Marco Garfias, Fernando Sica, Luis Núñez

flaminguettes.com
Julian Placencia: soundcloud.com/juliandiscoruido
Teen Flirt: soundcloud.com/teenflirt

Cast: Flaminguettes, Mara Soler and Daniela Villanueva

Tags: etereas, flaminguettes, animation, motion graphics, hula hoop, hooping, brecken rivara, tiana zoumer, daniela villanueva, mara soler, daniela villanueva valdes and mara soler guitian

Categories: Video

Support ‘Hardcore’ – the spiritual sequel to Bad Motherfucker on Indiegogo.
indiegogo.com/projects/hardcore-the-first-ever-action-pov-feature-film#home

Cast: Ilya Naishuller

Tags: biting elbows, bad motherfucker, ilya naishuller, pov, gopro, russia, moscow, blood, dog and fight

Categories: Video

Timelapse made with GoPro Hero3. GoPro attached with suction cup. One shot every 2 seconds

For more videos and photos look at my site yobre.com

Cast: yobre

Tags: gopro, gopro hero, gopro hero 3, milano, milan, italy, timelapse, car and suction cup

Categories: Video

Measure you mental and physical acuity

Cast: Belles Farm

Categories: Video

Created for Press Play/IndieWire’s “Genius Directors in Three Minutes” series:
It is a well known fact that Quentin Tarantino is a self-proclaimed cinephile. But the writer/director’s love for cinema is most obviously expressed through his own films. In addition to showing his characters spending a great deal of time discussing cinema, Tarantino’s films are jam-packed with homages and visual references to the movies that have intrigued him throughout his life.

Many filmmakers pay homage, but Tarantino takes things a step further by replicating exact moments from a variety of genres and smashing them together to create his own distinct vision. Just like ‘Kill Bill: Vol 2’ (2004) draws on ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ (1966) and ‘Samurai Fiction’ (1998), Tarantino’s work often reflects Spaghetti Westerns and Japanese cinema–both new and old. His unique way of referencing other films allows him to bend genre boundaries and shatter the mold of what we expect to experience. While his methods are often criticized and he is accused of “ripping off” other filmmakers, it seems that Tarantino is simply writing love letters to the art he is ever so passionate about.

From German silent-cinema to American B movies, the following video uses split-screen to demonstrate a few of the hundreds of visual film references over the course of Tarantino’s career.

Original Post: blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/watch-quentin-tarantinos-best-visual-film-references-in-three-minutes-20150522

Music: “Little Green Bag” by George Baker Selection
Tarantino Films:
‘Reservoir Dogs’ (1992)
‘Pulp Fiction’ (1994)
‘Jackie Brown’ (1997)
‘Kill Bill: Vol. 1’ (2003)
‘Kill Bill: Vol. 2’ (2004)
‘Death Proof’ (2007)
‘Inglourious Basterds’ (2009)
‘Django Unchained’ (2012)

Referenced Films (in order of appearance):
‘City on Fire’ (1987)
‘Django’ (1966)
‘Band of Outsiders’ (1964)
‘8 1/2’ (1963)
‘The Warriors’ (1979)
‘Psycho’ (1960)
‘Kiss Me Deadly’ (1955)
‘The Flintstones’ (1960-66)
‘Superchick’ (1973)
‘The Graduate’ (1967)
‘Citizen Kane’ (1941)
‘Goke, Body Snatcher From Hell’ (1968)
‘Lady Snowblood’ (1973)
‘City of the Living Dead’ (1980)
‘Black Sunday’ (1977)
‘Game of Death’ (1978)
‘Miller’s Crossing’ (1990)
‘Death Rides a Horse’ (1966)
‘Gone in 60 Seconds’ (1974)
‘Samurai Fiction’ (1998)
‘Blade Runner’ (1982)
‘The Searchers’ (1956)
‘Once Upon a Time in the West’ (1968)
‘Five Fingers of Death’ (1972)
‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ (1966)
‘Convoy’ (1978)
‘The Bird With the Crystal Plumage’ (1970)
‘Unforgiven’ (1992)
‘The Searchers’ (1956)
‘Metropolis’ (1927)
‘Django’ (1966)
‘Gone With the Wind’ (1939)
‘The Great Silence’ (1968)
‘A Professional Gun’ (1968)

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Cast: Jacob T. Swinney

Categories: Video

Cast: Gothamist

Tags: subway etiquette, etiquette and music

Categories: Video